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Mr Panagiotis Theoulakis

3 Reviews

I went to the Shaftesbury Avenue clinic last November. The results are pretty good - I've gone from -6 in both eyes to having near perfect vision. The downside is that I suffer from very dry eyes, and can sometimes have trouble fo ... Read more

Mr. Theoulakis is an experienced Ophthalmic Surgeon who has been working full time with the NHS in London since 2008. He has been running theatre lists at four London hospitals and specialises in complex cases. He is registered with the General Medical Council (GMC) and is on the specialist register as an Ophthalmologist.

Mr. Theoulakis has undergone specialist training in refractive surgery and is committed to delivering excellent patient care. He is also fluent in three languages and has worked in the Ophthalmology departments of hospitals around the world in order to gain experience and research in ophthalmic procedures.

Mr. Theoulakis gained his first class medical degree at the National University of Athens in 2002, he also trained in Switzerland and Northern Ireland in order to gain further ophthalmic qualifications. He regularly provides clinical teaching to medical students and presents regularly to specialist registrars and medical students. He is also an active fellow of the European Board of Ophthalmology (EBO) and a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ESCRS), American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ASCRS), and British Society for Refractive Surgery (BSRS). Twice every year, Mr. Theoulakis attends International Medical Advisory Board (IMAB) conferences and is annually assessed by this board. The panel consists of several of the world’s most eminent Refractive Surgeons including Mr. Steve Schallhorn, former Head of Ophthalmology for the US Navy, and Dr. Jan Venter, a world leading Ophthalmic Surgeon.

Mr. Theoulakis is actively involved in ongoing research and has had his work presented internationally and published in many accredited peer-reviewed journals. He enjoys teaching as well as being involved in the examining of medical students. He prides himself on keeping abreast of all developments in the fast paced field of refractive surgery.

Professional Memberships

* General Medical Council (GMC) – Member
* European Board of Ophthalmology (EBO) – Fellow
* American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) – Member
* European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ESCRS) – Member
* American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ASCRS) – Member
* British Society for Refractive Surgery (BSRS) – Member

Rating Date
10 May 2013

I went to the Shaftesbury Avenue clinic last November. The results are pretty good - I've gone from -6 in both eyes to having near perfect vision. The downside is that I suffer from very dry eyes, and can sometimes have trouble focusing. Eyedrops (when I feel the need) and eye exercises (five mins a day) help with both. My top tip - rest before the surgery, and get your eyes used to accepting eyedrops.Optical Express themselves have several things going for them - they are cheaper than many others, more flexible with appointment times and offer unlimited follow up consultations for the first year after surgery. The downside is that they are very impersonal, and you often feel like you're on a production line. In 8 appointments I've seen 7 opticians. On the day of my surgery all the test were done by different people, and none bothered to explain what they were doing. However, they got there in the end.The one tip I'd give anyone contemplating surgery is to not underestimate the surgery itself. The staff are always very keen to downplay the seriousness of it, and to explain how you can go back to work the next day etc, but actually it is a major operation. Taking a day or two off work before surgery is highly advisable, as you are then rested and everything is easier. I didn't do this, and was very tired on the day. I also wasn't used to eye drops, so my eyes scrunched up when they tried to put the anaesthetic eye drops in, and I'm not sure they were quite as effective as they could have been. This meant that my eyes were very uncomfortable during surgery (though not painful), and I also struggled to keep my eyes still and focused during surgery. The surgeon had to keep stopping and starting again, which lengthened the whole procedure significantly. The surgeon coped really well with this, but I think had I been rested and used to eye drops I might have felt less and found it easier to hold still, and would have been easier and quicker. I might even have avoided the dry eyes.The most important thing though, is that it worked! Despite the niggles, my vision has gone from -6 to -0. The dry eyes are manageable, and definitely a price worth paying for being free from glasses and lenses. Oh - and go for all the extras like wavefront etc. It may up the price, but it also improves your chances of good results.

10 May 2013

I went to the Shaftesbury Avenue clinic last November. The results are pretty good - I've gone from -6 in both eyes to having near perfect vision. The downside is that I suffer from very dry eyes, and can sometimes have trouble focusing. Eyedrops (when I feel the need) and eye exercises (five mins a day) help with both.Optical Express themselves have several things going for them - they are cheaper than many others, more flexible with appointment times and offer unlimited follow up consultations for the first year after surgery. The downside is that they are very impersonal, and you often feel like you're on a production line. In 8 appointments I've seen 7 opticians. On the day of my surgery all the test were done by different people, and none bothered to explain what they were doing. However, they got there in the end. The one tip I'd give anyone contemplating surgery is to not underestimate the surgery itself. The staff are always very keen to downplay the seriousness of it, and to explain how you can go back to work the next day etc, but actually it is a major operation. Taking a day or two off work before surgery is highly advisable, as you are then rested and everything is easier. I didn't do this, and was very tired on the day. This meant that I struggled to keep my eyes still and focused during surgery, which meant the surgeon had to keep stopping and starting again, and lengthened the whole procedure significantly. The surgeon coped really well with this, but I think had I been rested it would have been easier and quicker, and I might have avoided the dry eyes.And that's what it comes down to as well - despite the niggles, my vision has gone from -6 to -0. The dry eyes are manageable, and definitely a price worth paying for being free from glasses and lenses. Oh - and go for all the extras like wavefront etc. It may up the price, but it also improves your chances of good results.

I had my Lasik carried out just over 2 weeks ago on 14 December 2012. I was originally going to have monovision but on surgery day my surgeon advised that it would only be a very short term fix and that I would need reading glasses anyway within as little as 1-2 years (I am 49).My prescription was -4.00 in both eyes prior to surgery and my distance vision is perfect, HD now. My close up vision is still a little blurred (however, I am still managing to type this without reading glasses).Does anyone know if the blurriness does improve for close up vision? I do think that it will as I have been experimenting on my Kindle with large and regular sized text and the blurriness is pretty much the same with both.I would recommend Optical Express as they are very thorough and my surgeon in particular was excellent. Sandra xEd - Removed text mentioning vouchers.

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